CiC is dedicated to the health and safety of our patients and staff. We want to assure you we are taking precautions so we can continue to treat you appropriately while maintaining the health of our staff and community. Click here for more information

(480) 374-7354

prostate artery embolization for ENLARGED PROSTATE

PAE is a minimally invasive treatment, performed in our office, which helps improve symptoms from an enlarged prostate. It is an option for those who are not finding relief from medication, don’t want traditional surgery or are not able to have surgery.

Prostate Artery Embolization

About the procedure

Prostate (or Prostatic) Artery Embolization (PAE) is a minimally invasive procedure used by CiC doctors to treat enlargement of the prostate gland. Men with enlarged prostate often have difficulties with urination or erectile dysfunction. PAE is a safe, outpatient procedure that is favored over other treatments because it doesn’t require the use of general anesthesia or invasive surgery. Patients go home the same day.

Why it’s done
When the prostate gland becomes enlarged, it puts pressure on the urethra, causing symptoms such as:
• Difficulty starting urination, and weak or interrupted urination
• Difficulty controlling urination, or a sudden, urgent need to urinate
• Increased frequency of urination, especially at night
• Erectile dysfunction
These symptoms can interfere with everyday living.

What to expect

Preparation: You should not eat anything for four hours before the procedure, although you can drink water. You should tell your CiC physician beforehand about any medications you are currently taking, and whether you have ever been allergic to seafood or have had a bad reaction to injectable contrast dyes.
During: PAE is performed under light sedation, or “twilight sleep.” After applying a local anesthetic, CiC doctors introduce a catheter into a tiny nick in the skin, and guide it using X-ray fluoroscopy into the artery that supplies blood to the prostate. Small spheres are then injected into the artery to block it, which causes the prostate to shrink.
After: Immediately after the procedure, you will be brought to a recovery room for a few hours. At-home recovery may involve some mild pain, so you will be given a prescription to help alleviate any discomfort. You need to avoid strenuous activity for 24 hours and should be able to resume your normal activities within 3-4 days. Patients typically report relief from BPH symptoms within 2 to 3 weeks.

One Team, Your Team

Joel R. Rainwater, MD
Joel R. Rainwater, MD

Chief Medical Officer

James R. McEown, MD
James R. McEown, MD

Internal & Emergency Medicine, Phlebology

Karen Garby, MD, RPhS
Karen Garby, MD, RPhS

Director of Venous Intervention

David Lopresti, MD
David Lopresti, MD

Medical Director, Interventional Radiology

Michael Switzer, MD
Michael Switzer, MD

Interventional Radiology Endovascular Specialist

Michael H. Makki, DO, FACC
Michael H. Makki, DO, FACC

Interventional Cardiology

Jeff Braxton, MD, FACS
Jeff Braxton, MD, FACS
Kevin Duwe, MD
Kevin Duwe, MD

Interventional Radiology Endovascular Specialist

Christy Holmstrom, RRA, RPA
Christy Holmstrom, RRA, RPA